Category Archives: Digital Humanities

On-line workshop, February 17-19 – Sentiment analysis on multilingual 18th-century corpora

We give notice of the on-line workshop Sentiment Analysis in Literary studies organized by the Centre for Information Modelling of the University of Graz. Sentiment analysis is a common task in literary studies, yet sitting outside the mainstream of analytic computational procedures … Continue reading

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Analytic and Continental Philosophy: playing around with quantitative methods

by Pietro Lana   What can quantitative methods tell us about the differences between the Analytic and the Continental philosophical traditions? Attempts to define, characterize and distinguish the two have led to such a variety of positions that even the … Continue reading

Posted in Data-Driven Research, Digital Humanities, Distant Reading, History of analytic philosophy, History of philosophy, Quantitative methods, Text mining, Text-Mining | 1 Comment

Three-day on-line conference, Nov. 23-24-25, 2020

We are pleased to give notice of the next three-day conference organised by the Digital Humanities department at the University of Basel: “Digital Practices. Reading, writing and evaluation on the web”. The conference will take place online, November 23–25, 2020.  … Continue reading

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New DR2 Paper is out on Synthese

We are pleased to announce that a new paper by DR2 co-founders Guido Bonino and Paolo Tripodi, together with another DR2 affiliate member, Paolo Maffezioli, has been published on Synthese: “Logic in analytic philosophy: a quantitative analysis”.  Abstract: Using quantitative … Continue reading

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Joint Paper by three DR2 Members

We are pleased to announce and to share the publication of this joint paper, written by three DR2 members: “Reclutamento accademico: come tutelare il pluralismo epistemico? Un modello di simulazione ad agenti”, Carlo Debernardi, Eleonora Priori e Marco Viola, Sistemi … Continue reading

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Interesting tutorials @Programming Historian

Following the posts of the past few weeks, today we present an interesting website – and peer-reviewed journal – on the same wake. That is Programming Historian, a useful, multilingual and open access collection of tutorials about computational tecniques for … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Humanities, Distant Reading, History of ideas, Methodology, Quantitative methods, Text mining, Text-Mining, Tutorials | Tagged | Leave a comment

DR2-INTERVIEWS: Interview with Peter De Bolla

With this interview we open the series of the “DR2-Interviews”, a new section of this blog dedicated to questions and answers about the use of quantitative methods. A few months ago one of our members, Paolo Babbiotti, was in Cambridge … Continue reading

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November in Turin: a lot of DR2 events!

This is a very hot November for the quantitative history of philosophy! On Thursday 14th Eugenio Petrovich gave an informal seminar in Italian, entitled “Approcci reticolari in storia della filosofia analitica contemporanea: reti di citazioni e reti di acknowledgments” (Network approaches … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Humanities, Distant Reading, DR2, Fondazione CRT, Franco Moretti | Tagged , | Leave a comment

A grant for the DR2 group

Good news for the DR2 Research Group! We are pleased to announce that the DR2 research group has been awarded a grant by Fondazione CRT for the project REPOSUM. The project is based on a public-private partnership and, in particular, … Continue reading

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